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July 15, 2022 0

If you have chronic kidney disease (CKD), you can take steps to protect your kidneys from more damage.

  • Maintain a healthy blood pressure level.

The most important thing you can do to treat kidney illness is to control your blood pressure. Hypertension can cause kidney injury. You can preserve your kidneys by maintaining the blood pressure at or below the level recommended by your doctor. Blood pressure will be less than 140/90 mm Hg for the majority of people.

  • If you have diabetes, achieve your blood glucose target.

Your specialist would also check your A1C.. The A1C complete blood count ( cbc determines your normal blood sugar level over the last three months. This test is distinct from the routine blood glucose tests you perform. The higher your A1C score, the larger your blood sugar over the last three months. Maintain a close eye on your daily blood glucose levels to help you reach your A1C target.

  • Assess your kidney health with the help of your medical team.

The tests used by doctors to diagnose kidney illness could also be used to detect changes in kidney function and damage. Kidney disease deteriorates with time. Ask your healthcare provider how well the test findings compare to the previous ones every time you are examined.

  • Take medicines exactly as directed.

Take your medicines as per your doctor’s advice.

  • Create a food plan with the help of a dietician.
  • Include physical activity in your daily routine.
  • Strive towards a healthy weight.
  • Get adequate rest.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Discover healthy coping mechanisms for stress and despair.

If you are facing these 10 Things, Get Kidney Treatment at our San Dimas, Covina, Pasadena, Upland & Ontario Clinics. Please call to make an appointment: California Kidney Specialists

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June 23, 2022 0

Myth: All kidney diseases are incurable

Fact: Most kidney diseases are curable with timely treatment. Some kidney diseases are irreversible and progressive (progress towards end-stage renal failure), but this progression can be slowed down if the disease is detected and treated early and appropriately.

Myth: There’s nothing you can do about getting Kidney Disease

Fact: Most cases of kidney disease could be prevented.

Diabetes & High Blood Pressure cause nearly three-fourths of all cases of kidney failure. Keeping those conditions under control can help you prevent Kidney Disease

Myth: Kidney Stones cause kidney disease

Fact: Kidney stones rarely cause kidney damage.

1 in 10 people will have a kidney stone, yet the great majority will never develop kidney disease. Kidney stones are rarely left untreated because they are so painful. Help prevent kidney stones by drinking plenty of water every day.

Myth: I feel fine, so I don’t need to continue with treatment

Fact: Many patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) feel very well with proper therapy, and so they may discontinue medications/treatment. Discontinuation of therapy in CKD can be dangerous., as it can lead to rapid worsening of kidney function leading to an earlier requirement for initiation of dialysis/kidney transplantation.

 Myth: Kidney Transplant cannot happen before dialysis

Fact: Pre-emptive transplantation refers to kidney transplantation before a patient needs to start dialysis therapy. Patients who get a pre-emptive transplant receive their kidney when their health is generally good, which can improve new kidney function and enhance overall health and life expectancy.

Myth: No one knows what causes kidney disease.

Fact: The two most common causes of kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure. Both can harm your kidneys by causing damage to the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys. Many other conditions can harm the kidneys.

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June 16, 2022 0

If you have high blood pressure, your doctor might recommend getting more exercise. While medication can help manage your blood pressure, exercise is an excellent way to help lower your blood pressure by making your heart stronger and maintaining a healthy weight.

  1. Aerobic classes. Sign up for classes like aqua aerobics, Zumba, and a functional fitness class. When in doubt, ask your gym or rec center what classes they offer that fit your needs.
  2. Hiking: The muscle power needed to climb a road on an incline, a hill or a mountain can help you achieve a greater level of fitness. Physical activity such as hiking can lower blood pressure up to 10 points.
  3. Riding your bike does count if it’s done for at least 10 minutes and you’re actively pedaling. A beginner cycling class could also be a great way to get a workout scheduled into your routine.
  4. Swimming: This form of exercise can be beneficial in controlling blood pressure in adults 60 and older, another study found. Over a period of 12 weeks, swimmer participants gradually worked their way up to 45 minutes of continuous swimming at a time. By the end of the study, the swimmers had reduced their systolic blood pressure by an average of nine points.
  5. Brisk walking. You’ll have to walk faster than you normally walk to elevate your heart and break

 

All CKS Nephrologists have expertise in treating and preventing Primary/Essential and Secondary Hypertension. Our Nephrologists will work with our patients and their families to create a comprehensive plan of treatment that will include dietary counseling, exercise, and medications to optimize blood pressure control.

 

Hypertension, or High Blood Pressure, which if left untreated, increases the risk of your having a heart attack Get treated at our San Dimas, Covina, Pesadana, Upland & Ontario Clinics

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June 1, 2022 0

Dietary restrictions vary depending on the stage of kidney disease.

For instance, people with early stages of chronic kidney disease will have different dietary restrictions than those with end-stage renal disease, or kidney failure.

Those with end-stage renal disease who require dialysis will also have varying dietary restrictions. Dialysis is a type of treatment that removes extra water and filters waste.

The majority of those with late or end-stage kidney disease will need to follow a kidney-friendly diet to avoid a buildup of certain chemicals or nutrients in the blood.

In those with chronic kidney disease, the kidneys cannot adequately remove excess sodium, potassium, or phosphorus. As a result, they’re at a higher risk of elevated blood levels of these minerals.

A kidney-friendly diet, or renal diet, usually limits sodium to under 2,300 mg per day, as well as your potassium and phosphorus intake.

The National Kidney Foundation’s most recent Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) guidelines don’t set specific limits on potassium or phosphorus

Potassium and phosphorus are still a concern for people with kidney disease, but they should work closely with their doctor or dietitian to determine their limits for these nutrients, which are usually based on lab results.

Damaged kidneys may also have trouble filtering the waste products of protein metabolism. Therefore, individuals with chronic kidney disease of all stages especially stage 3–5, should limit the amount of protein in their diets unless they’re on dialysis

However, those with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis have an increased protein requirement

Here are 17 foods that you should likely avoid on a renal diet.

 

  • Avocados
  • Canned foods
  • Whole wheat bread
  • Brown rice
  • Bananas
  • Dairy
  • Oranges and orange juice
  • Pickles, olives, and relish
  • Apricots
  • Potatoes and sweet potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Packaged, instant, and premade meals
  • Swiss chard, spinach, and beet greens
  • Dates, raisins, and prunes
  • Pretzels, chips, and crackers

If you have kidney disease, reducing your potassium, phosphorus, and sodium intake can be an important aspect of managing the disease.

The high sodium, high potassium, and high phosphorus foods listed above are likely best limited or avoided.

 

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June 1, 2022 0
  1. You’re more tired, have less energy, or are having trouble concentrating. A severe decrease in kidney function can lead to a buildup of toxins and impurities in the blood. This can cause people to feel tired, and weak and can make it hard to concentrate. Another complication of kidney disease is anemia, which can cause weakness and fatigue.
  2. You’re having trouble sleeping. When the kidneys aren’t filtering properly, toxins stay in the blood rather than leaving the body through the urine. This can make it difficult to sleep. There is also a link between obesity and chronic kidney disease, and sleep apnea is more common in those with chronic kidney disease, compared with the general population.
  3. You have dry and itchy skin. Healthy kidneys do many important jobs. They remove wastes and extra fluid from your body, help make red blood cells, help keep bones strong and work to maintain the right amount of minerals in your blood. Dry and itchy skin can be a sign of the mineral and bone disease that often accompanies advanced kidney disease when the kidneys are no longer able to keep the right balance of minerals and nutrients in your blood.
  4. You feel the need to urinate more often. If you feel the need to urinate more often, especially at night, this can be a sign of kidney disease. When the kidney filters are damaged, it can cause an increase in the urge to urinate. Sometimes this can also be a sign of a urinary infection or enlarged prostate in men.
  5. You see blood in your urine. Healthy kidneys typically keep the blood cells in the body when filtering wastes from the blood to create urine, but when the kidney’s filters have been damaged, these blood cells can start to “leak” out into the urine. In addition to signaling kidney disease, blood in the urine can be indicative of tumors, kidney stones, or an infection.
  6. Your urine is foamy. Excessive bubbles in the urine – especially those that require you to flush several times before they go away—indicate protein in the urine. This foam may look like the foam you see when scrambling eggs, as the common protein found in urine, albumin, is the same protein that is found in eggs.
  7. You’re experiencing persistent puffiness around your eyes. Protein in the urine is an early sign that the kidneys’ filters have been damaged, allowing the protein to leak into the urine. This puffiness around your eyes can be because your kidneys are leaking a large amount of protein in the urine, rather than keeping it in the body.
  8. Your ankles and feet are swollen. Decreased kidney function can lead to sodium retention, causing swelling in your feet and ankles. Swelling in the lower extremities can also be a sign of heart disease, liver disease, and chronic leg vein problems.
  9. You have a poor appetite. This is a very general symptom, but a buildup of toxins resulting from reduced kidney function can be one of the causes.
  10. Your muscles are cramping. Electrolyte imbalances can result from impaired kidney function. For example, low calcium levels and poorly controlled phosphorus may contribute to muscle cramping

If you have Some Signs of Kidney Disease then contact us. Our goal at California Kidney Specialists is to prevent Chronic Kidney Disease and slow its progression to avoid the initiation of dialysis.

Part of prevention and treatment is a specific CKD diet. We work with our patients and their families to create a comprehensive plan.

Call and make an appointment today to meet one of our Nephrologists

Our Services Office Locations: Kidney treatment in San Dimas, Kidney treatment in Covina, Kidney treatment in Upland, Kidney Treatment in Pasadena

 

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May 25, 2022 0

Diabetic nephropathy is a serious complication of type 1 diabetes and types 2 diabetes. It’s also called diabetic kidney disease. In the United States, about 1 in 3 people living with diabetes have diabetic nephropathy.

Diabetic nephropathy affects the kidneys’ ability to do their usual work of removing waste products and extra fluid from your body. The best way to prevent or delay diabetic nephropathy is by maintaining a healthy lifestyle and adequately managing your diabetes and high blood pressure.

Over many years, the condition slowly damages your kidneys’ delicate filtering system. Early treatment may prevent or slow the disease’s progress and reduce the chance of complications.

Kidney disease may progress to kidney failure, also called end-stage kidney disease. Kidney failure is a life-threatening condition. At this stage, treatment options are dialysis or a kidney transplant.

What Are the Symptoms of Diabetic Nephropathy?

There are often no symptoms with early diabetic nephropathy. As the kidney function worsens, symptoms may include:

  • Swelling of the hands, feet, and face
  • Trouble sleeping or concentrating
  • Poor appetite
  • Nausea
  • Weakness
  • Itching (end-stage kidney disease) and extremely dry skin
  • Drowsiness (end-stage kidney disease)
  • Abnormalities in the heart’s regular rhythm, because of increased potassium in the blood
  • Muscle twitching

As kidney damage progresses, your kidneys cannot remove the waste from your blood. The waste then builds up in your body and can reach poisonous levels, a condition known as uremia. People with uremia are often confused and occasionally become comatose.

Diabetic nephropathy is a reliable cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In ESRD, the kidneys no longer work well to meet the needs of daily life. ESRD can lead to kidney failure, which can have life-threatening consequences. Our CKS Nephrologists will work with our patients and their families to develop a comprehensive treatment plan that includes dietary counseling, exercise, and medication to improve blood sugar control.

How is diabetic nephropathy treated?

In the early stages of diabetic nephropathy, your treatment plan may include medications to manage the following: Blood pressure control. Medications called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin 2 receptor blockers (ARBs) are used to treat high blood pressure. Blood sugar control

Get Diabetic nephropathy treatment at our San Dimas, Covina, Pasadena, Upland & Ontario Clinics. Please call to make an appointment: California Kidney Specialists

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May 17, 2022 0

What is dialysis?
Dialysis is a treatment that filters and purifies the blood using a machine. This helps keep your fluids and electrolytes in balance when the kidneys can’t do their job. Dialysis has been used since the 1940s to treat people with kidney problems.
Dialysis does the work of your kidneys, removing waste products and excess fluid from the blood.

How do I prepare for dialysis?
Before your first dialysis treatment, your doctor will surgically implant a tube or device to gain access to your bloodstream. This is typically a quick operation. You should be able to return home the same day.
It’s best to wear comfortable clothing during your dialysis treatments. Also, follow your doctor’s instructions. These may include fasting for a certain amount of time before the treatment.

What are the types of dialysis?
There are two ways to get dialysis:
• Hemodialysis.
• Peritoneal dialysis

Hemodialysis
With hemodialysis, a machine removes blood from your body, filters it through a dialyzer (artificial kidney), and returns the cleaned blood to your body. This 3- to 5-hour process may take place in a hospital or a dialysis center three times a week.

Peritoneal dialysis
With peritoneal dialysis, tiny blood vessels inside the abdominal lining (peritoneum) filter blood through the aid of a dialysis solution. This solution is a type of cleaning liquid that contains water, salt, and other additives.

Risks
• Low blood pressure (hypotension).
• Muscle cramps
• Itching
• Sleep problems
• Anemia
• Bone diseases
• High blood pressure (hypertension)
• Fluid overload

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May 11, 2022 0

What is a kidney transplant?

A kidney transplant is surgery done to replace a diseased kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. The kidney may come from a deceased organ donor or a living donor. Family members or others who are a good match may be able to donate one of their kidneys. This type of transplant is called a living transplant.

What are the reasons for a kidney transplant?

You may need a kidney transplant if you have the end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This is a permanent condition of kidney failure. It often needs dialysis. This is a process used to remove wastes and other substances from the blood.

Complications of the procedure

Kidney transplant surgery carries a risk of significant complications, including:

  • Blood clots and bleeding
  • Leaking from or blockage of the tube that links the kidney to the bladder (ureter)
  • Infection
  • Failure or rejection of the donated kidney
  • An infection or cancer that can be passed on from the donated kidney
  • Death, heart attack, and stroke

Anti-rejection medication side effects

After a kidney transplant, you’ll take medications to help prevent your body from rejecting the donor’s kidney. These medications can cause a variety of side effects, including:

  • Bone thinning and bone damage
  • Diabetes
  • The excessive hair growth or hair loss
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol

Other side effects may include:

  • Increased risk of cancer, particularly skin cancer and lymphoma
  • Infection
  • Puffiness
  • Weight gain
  • Acne

How do you prepare your body for a kidney transplant?

  1. Stop smoking. Kick the habit at least 4 weeks before your surgery. …
  2. Ask your doctor about medicines. You’ll need to avoid drugs like aspirin, ibuprofen, and blood thinners for a week before your surgery. …
  3. Take this time to do the things you enjoy.

If you do decide to have a kidney transplant, you’ll need to work closely with a nephrologist who is associated with an accredited kidney transplant program with good patient outcomes

Kidney transplantation is an excellent choice. Just be sure to work with a team that has enthusiasm and passion, who is involved in active research, and who has an active database to connect you with the right donors.

 

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California kidney specialists

California Kidney Specialists is one of the largest kidney care groups In Southern California with over 35 years of dedicated service & has a team of experienced nephrologists, kidney transplant specialists and kidney transplant surgeons in California.

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